Meet the Inventor & Product History

Hi, my name is Mike Kasbohm and I'm the inventor of the Trash Bag Cinch products. I've been coming up with simple solutions to everyday problems as long as I can remember, and I have patented many of them.

We can all relate to the mess associated with what I call "trash bag cave-ins" and the mess left behind (yuck) that no one wants to deal with, right?

But you might say I had a more intense relationship with this issue, as back in the late 70’s while in high school I was a janitor ("environmental engineer" I believe was the title bestowed on us at the time) at Fairview Southdale Hospital in Edina, MN. It was a good job, and it helped me save and pay for my college tuition.  

By the way, you may find it interesting to learn that trash bags were originally invented for hospital use too. Lean more about the history of trash bags here

Anyway, one of the tasks I performed as a hospital janitor was tying knots in the trash can liners to keep them from falling in the can (by making the opening smaller to fit snugly around the rim of the can) and to avoid the risk of injury, exposure to germs, and a host of other potential problems.

Until a few years ago, that task was performed at virtually every hospital, often thousands of times daily at larger facilities. I alone tied hundreds of knots every day that I worked as a janitor. It’s still done too (at facilities who don't yet know about the Trash Bag Cinch) because the investment it takes in time (labor cost) to tie the knot each time (to avoid the problems) is still needed and well worth taking the time to do so.

I got pretty efficient at tying knots. Although more often than I’d like to have admitted at the time, I sometimes tied off the bag too small and tore it trying to stretch it enough to fit. Other times the opposite was true and it was too large and would still fall in. But I had no choice on whether to do it or not - it was mandated by the management.

On average (after I got efficient at it), I probably took 5 – 10 seconds additional time to actually tie the knot each time I changed a trash can liner.

That may not seem like much, but when you add it all up over a period of time it really adds up:

Let’s say a hospital has 500 trash cans in it that get changed once a day. That’s ~30 times a month, or 15,000 times per month for all 500 trash cans. Now let’s say that all the custodians are efficient, and they average 5 seconds to tie the knot (and to all issues related to tying the knot) per liner change. If you do the math, (15,000 x 5 = 75,000/3600 seconds per hour) It adds up to 20.83 labor hours each and every month.

What if the hospital could save that five seconds on every liner change? If they paid an average of $12/hr. (including benefits), that 20.83 hours equates to $250 per month or $3000 per year.

Would it be worth a one-time $995 investment for that same hospital to retrofit their 500  trash cans with this simple technology(just $1.99 each)? I think most would agree that’s a pretty fast R.O.I. (less than four months) and great savings in labor year after year thereafter. And these savings don’t take into account other benefits – like the fact that most users are able to reduce liner costs by up to 20% or more (by reducing the number of liner sizes they have to stock, and by eliminating the practice of over-lining).

Of course this savings potential isn't limited to hospitals. Anywhere and anyone who uses trash bags in their trash cans can benefit from this simple invention. I've sold millions of these little gizmos to hospitals, office buildings, government buildings, schools, and businesses around the world.

Take a minute to find out how much your facility can save...

Or if you'd like to just order a few for home use, now you can. If it works for hospitals and professional cleaners, it will work for you too.

Thank you for your time.

Best regards,